Counselling and Psychotherapy Practice

Therapeutic support for individuals | Adoption support & Supervision | Training

Individual Therapy

A safe place to unpack life’s difficulties, make sense of past events and think together of ways to rebuild and move forward.

Adoption Support

I offer support to adoptive parents and families. I also offer supervision to adoption practitioners and support workers.

Workshops and Training

I offer training on trauma and attachment in the field of adoption as well as workshops and training through the Black, African and Asian Therapy Network

Eugene Ellis

MA, Dip. PSA accredited, UKCP registered, Integrative Arts Psychotherapist

I trained as an Integrative Arts psychotherapist and have worked for many years with severely traumatised children and their families in the field of adoption and fostering, as well as working in private practice. I have a special interest in body orientated therapies and I am also the founder of the Black, African and Asian Therapy Network.

My Expertise

I use a range of body-orientated, trauma-informed approaches including Sensorimotor Psychotherapy, Somatic Experiencing, Sensory Integration techniques, mentalisation and mindfulness. As an Integrative Arts Psychotherapist, I also facilitate self-healing through the use of metaphor and the imagination. My supervision of adoption practitioners and workers is trauma and attachment focussed, including DDP and Theraplay. I am sensitive to issues of race, culture, and sexuality.

Frequently Asked Questions

What is therapy about?

I provide a supportive, non-judgemental and confidential environment in which to explore any emotional distress or difficulties you may be experiencing or any loss of direction and purpose. I will perceive any difficulties from your point of view and help you to see your difficulties from new perspectives. Therapy is a way of enabling choice and reducing confusion.

I’ve got lots of friends whom I can speak to, why will a therapist be different?

Talking to friends and loved ones can be very supportive, and it’s great if your problems are sorted out in this way. Sometimes, however, it is difficult for the people we know well to be objective and honest because of their feelings for us and their roles in our lives. You may be reluctant to share certain aspects of your life with them, or you may be concerned about overwhelming them with your problems. Furthermore, our family and friends often cannot recognise the type or seriousness of a psychological problem nor the best way to help us cope. Talking to a trained professional can provide the outside perspective you need to understand where you are stuck and how to take steps to improve your life.

I’ve got lots of friends whom I can speak to, why will a therapist be different?

Talking to friends and loved ones can be very supportive, and it’s great if your problems are sorted out in this way. Sometimes, however, it is difficult for the people we know well to be objective and honest because of their feelings for us and their roles in our lives. You may be reluctant to share certain aspects of your life with them, or you may be concerned about overwhelming them with your problems. Furthermore, our family and friends cannot recognise the type or seriousness of a psychological problem nor the best way to help us cope with it. Talking to a trained professional can provide the outside perspective you need to understand where you are stuck and how to take steps to get better.

What should I expect when I see you?

You can expect to be listened to, and I will ask you pertinent questions about your life and your background, including your relationships with others. You may expect to be asked about what you hope to get out of therapy or what your goals are. The first session is an assessment session where you can get a feel for our mutuality in working together. I will then help you develop an understanding of how you can resolve your issues, and suggest a treatment plan for how we might work together. The length of the treatment will depend on your aims and on the complexity of your concerns.

Isn’t going to therapy a sign of weakness?

There is a myth that seeing a therapist is a sign of weakness, that strong people should be able to work things out for themselves and have no need for counselling. Entering into your self inner with a view to leading a more positive way of life is a sign of courage rather than weakness.

Don’t I need to be in crisis or have serious mental health problems?

Another myth is that counselling is only for people who are in crisis or for those that have serious mental health problems. This myth is also untrue. Many people attend counselling or psychotherapy as a way to pre-empt a crisis. They might wish to work through everyday difficulties and work towards living a more healthy and positive lifestyle.

Contact Me

Currently Not Taking On New Clients

07933 202872

Walthamstow E17 and Upper Holloway N7